Review: We Learn Nothing

We Learn Nothing by Tim Kreider My rating: 5 of 5 stars Like "I'll Tell You in Person" by Chloe Caldwell, this collection of essays is an achingly authentic look into what it means to be human. And like Chloe, Tim is an extraordinary storyteller-the yang to her yin. Politically, it's clear where Tim stands but what's so rare, so beautiful and so endearing about this writer is that he's

2017-07-08T17:48:55+00:00 July 8th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review, Essays, Humor|Comments Off on Review: We Learn Nothing

Review: Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull My rating: 4 of 5 stars This is storytelling at its finest--straight from the heart, reflective, humble, and wise. Ed Catmull shares his journey toward his dream of creating the first animated picture at Pixar. Ed is incredibly introspective and thoughtful. Unlike many business manifestos, there are no slick sound bites here. The

2017-07-08T17:28:54+00:00 July 8th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review, Business, Innovation, Technology|Comments Off on Review: Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Review: Little Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal

Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal by Conor Grennan My rating: 4 of 5 stars Conor Grennan's journey started with a two-month gig volunteering at an orphanage in Nepal and ended years later with the founding of a non-profit, raising funds and securing a home for at-risk children, and finding the parents of every last child he met that had been trafficked and

2017-07-08T11:53:02+00:00 July 8th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review, Memoirs, Nonfiction, Travel|Comments Off on Review: Little Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal

Review: When Breath Becomes Air

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi My rating: 4 of 5 stars A fascinating peek into the mind and everyday life of a young resident neurosurgeon (e.g., daily activities, life priorities, view of patients, how treatment decisions are made, and a glimpse into brain surgery) married with the rare perspective of this same individual facing death from cancer. A conundrum. The perspective is both clinical and emotional. View all

2017-07-08T11:03:46+00:00 July 8th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review, Medicine, Sociology|Comments Off on Review: When Breath Becomes Air

Review: Love Wins: The Lovers and Lawyers Who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality

Love Wins: The Lovers and Lawyers Who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality by Debbie Cenziper My rating: 5 of 5 stars When I meet someone especially humble, kind, tolerant and compassionate with a gift for lighthearted but irreverent humor I know--with fairly good certainty--that I've met someone who has traveled a difficult path. Jim Obergefell, one-half of the couple featured in this book is just such a person.

2017-07-07T11:18:49+00:00 July 7th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review, Civil Rights, History, Nonfiction|Comments Off on Review: Love Wins: The Lovers and Lawyers Who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality

Review: Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson My rating: 4 of 5 stars Rarely do I laugh out loud when I read. I couldn't help myself with Furiously Happy. It's hysterical, insightful, heart-wrenching. Let's get mental illness out of the closet and celebrate the magnificent humans like Jenny Lawson who have the courage to reveal who they are and the struggles that so many millions deal

2017-07-07T11:03:25+00:00 July 7th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review|Comments Off on Review: Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Review: Personal History

Personal History by Katharine Graham My rating: 0 of 5 stars I enjoyed this book on three levels. First, it offers a sneak peek into the “who’s who” in American business, politics, and society from the 1930’s to the ‘60s and beyond. Katherine Graham and her family traveled in powerful circles. Every page turn reveals a fascinating new relationship or acquaintance. (The old photos are fun too!) Second, if you’re

2017-07-05T23:46:28+00:00 July 5th, 2017|Autobiography, Book Review, Media Studies|Comments Off on Review: Personal History
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